Skagit Food Co-op blog:

CV, the wine guy

CV, the Wine Guy, talks Yalumba & Lumo

photoRed Wine: Old Bush Vine Grenache
Producer: Yalumba
Varietal: Grenache
Geographic Region: Barossa, Australia
Year: 2012
Price: $17.99
CV Says: After 165 years of winemaking in the Barossa region of Australia (it’s the ‘down under’ version of Napa Valley), Yalumba has great strength as a company, and produces spectacular wines.  Yalumba’s bush vines are these these low-yielding, really gnarly looking creatures of vines. They come out of the earth and hang on there forever and ever; the grapes grown on bush vines are really intense. Yalumba is fortunate to have some of the oldest Grenache vines in the Barossa, with fruit for this wine being sourced from vines planted in 1898, and nurtured by the wine-making family since.

The wine maker, Jane Ferrari, is an absolute kick. I know her personally, and she’s just this burly Australian with that wonderful Australian humor. She has a huge passion for the wine that she’s making.

A granche has dark ripe fruit flavors — when we say dark, we mean plum. It’s a rich, bold wine with a tannic back. It’s going to open up, and then open up, and open up, and open up even further. And then when you have the last sip, you’ll say, “Oh man, I should have waited, because this wine is really coming on right now.” This is truly a bottle of wine where the next day, it will be a completely different bottle than when you first open it up. It’s that power-packed. These vines are 35-70 years old, so that’s really going to make a difference.

You should absolutely open the bottle and let it sit and get some air for an hour or two before pouring. It’s got the modern Stelvin closure (twist top). This is the new way to close all wines — good or bad. The Stelvin closure is a terrific way to close the bottle: you don’t have to worry about corked* wines. Some wine drinkers equate twist-top bottles with cheap wine, but that isn’t the case. Seeing a twist-top bottle of wine is no indication of what’s inside. (And, then, of course, you get the added convenience of not needing to carry around a corkscrew.)

(Fun fact: This wine is vegan. Not all wines are — typically, egg whites are used for filtration. In this case, they’re not using any animal products whatsoever.)

White Wine: Lumo
Producer: Colterenzio
Varietal: Pinot Grigio
Geographic Region: Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy (this area is at the very northern part of Italy)
Year: 2012
Price: $9.99
CV Says: We’ve had Lumo for a while, and it’s turned out to be a wonderful, well-accepted bottle of Pinot Grigio. This is easy-drinking wine — paired especially well with salads and light meats. This is the real thing: it’s got the flavor profile of an authentic Italian Pinot Grigio. You’ll taste crisp fruits, citrus, stone fruit, maybe a little apple. It will have a bit of tartness to it, and mineral (stone) flavor). A good Italian Pinot Grigio will be different from those we get from Oregon. It’s going to be leaner in style,  and with that light, apertif-esque mineral taste. A classic European white wine — all for only 10 bucks!

* (from the Grenache entry) Corked means that a wine has been contaminated, not just by a cork taste, but by the presence of a chemical compound called TCA (2,4,6 – trichloroanisole). TCA is formed when natural fungi (of which many reside in cork) come in contact with certain chlorides found in bleaches and other winery sanitation / sterilization products. Since the discovery (only as recent as the early 1990’s) of the cause of cork taint, most wineries have totally eliminated the use of chlorine based clearing products. While unpleasant to taste, cork taint is not in any way harmful to humans. Corked wines smell and taste of damp, soggy, wet or rotten cardboard. Cork taint dulls the fruit in a wine, renders it lackluster and cuts the finish. (Description used from The Kitchn.)

By: CV, The Wine Guy

CV, The Wine GuyCV is our resident wine guy and our newest cheese specialist. And he’s here to give you generous, succinct, friendly advice on wines (and cheese). CV is quick to say that he’s not a wine “expert” — he’s not the person to go to for fancy terminology — but he does know wine, and approaches it with robust energy and a desire to match wine with people, food, and experiences.